Q Fever Register

Q Fever is a disease that can be spread to humans mainly from cattle, sheep and goats. The germ is spread in the urine, faeces and milk, but birth fluids, the foetus and the placenta are the most dangerous sources. When infected fluids dry out, the germ can remain alive in the dust for years. People can become infected by begin splashed with infected fluids, or by breathing in infected dust.

When infected some people experience no signs, while others just feel a little 'off colour' for a few days. Most people, however, feel like they have a bad case of the 'flu, with fever and sweating, nausea, vomiting and diarrhoea for 7 to 10 days. For most people, these signs pass and there are no more problems. If you already have heart problems, you may get infection of the heart valves and severe illness as a result.

The Australian Q Fever Register is a database to store information about the Q Fever immune status of people who have agreed to be part of the register.

The purpose of the Register is to help people working in high risk industries avoid getting the disease. It does this by allowing employers to quickly find out if you are immune or not. If you are not immune, you can be vaccinated before you are exposed to the risk of infection.

The Australian Q Fever Register stores information on the Q fever immune status of individuals. This site has general information on Q fever, information on the Register, as well as providing password access to registered users. The Register commenced full national coverage on 1st July 2002. 

Link to Q Fever Register